I believe it is one of women’s (many) God-given rights to do crazy things to their hair. So when my sister (who blogs at the delightful Notes by a Domestic Goddess) came to me and said she was thinking of trying out the dip-dye hair colour trend that has been popping up on many a Pinterest pinboard, I was totally on board. After getting a quote at a fancy hair salon in the ballpark of $350, we decided to do it at home instead. Aren’t we daring?

Well our daringness paid off, because look how awesome she looks now:

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Think you’d like to try it out too? Here is how we did it.

The first thing we did was visit the lovely ladies at Price Attack and admit we had no idea what we were doing. They talked us through the whole process, showed us what products we would need and answered what I’m sure were very, very Hairdressing 101-type questions without giving off even a whiff of judgement.

Most of the tutorials we’d seen online (specifically here) were done on blonde hair, but Ali’s hair is a medium brown colour:

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So the first thing we had to do was lighten it. The Price Attack ladies had given us the mildest concentration of bleach that they said would do the job without destroying the hair too much. I mixed the bleach up, popped it on and wrapped it in foil to lock the heat in and help it do its job — I felt very hairdresser-y!

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Ali’s freshly bleached hair. A bit patchy because her hair had been coloured a couple of times before (definitely not anything to do with my super-pro bleach application skills) but in the end it actually worked in our favour — it doesn’t look too uniform.

Now it was colour time! We had to do some chin stroking to decide the best way of alternating the two colours Ali had chosen: pink and purple. In the end, I divided her hair into four sections and used the end of a tail comb to separate alternating locks of hair, kind of like the way hairdressers do that up-and-down thing with the tail comb when they’re separating hair for foils.

To create a graduated dip-dye effect, this hair tutorial suggested using two shades of the same colour and applying it so you saw a bit of blonde, a bit of the lighter colour and then the brightest version of the colour only at the ends. We used Fudge’s Whiter Shade of Pale with our Fudge colours (Pretty Flamingo and Purple Haze) to mix up pastel versions of the colours.

They still looked pretty bright in the mixing bowls!

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On went the colour, to develop for about 20 minutes. It was around this stage that Ali informed me that she had only wanted a couple of inches right at the end to be bleached and coloured (you will recall from the photos above that I had done many more inches than that). This was an awkward conversation to have with someone sitting in my lounge room with a head covered in bubblegum-coloured hair dye and foil, but by now it was too late for regrets!

Anyway, the finished product speaks for itself:

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